Cover The space formerly occupied by Raffles Grill is now home to Anne-Sophie Pic's first restaurant in Asia (Image: La Dame De Pic)

Raffles Hotel Singapore, which reopened its doors in 2019, offers a multitude of delicious offerings for gourmands and imbibers alike

This story was first published on July 31, 2019, and updated on April 5, 2021.

Raffles Hotel Singapore officially re-opened its in 2019 after a massive two-year renovation. While the conserved building’s shell has been kept intact, including its stark white colour, much has changed within the expansive hotel in terms of shopping and dining experiences.

When it comes to restaurants, popular restaurants like The Halia, Royal Blue China and BBR by Alain Ducasse have exited the building for good. But the good news is that the hotel has revitalised its offerings by including interesting new concepts, some of which are from the biggest names in the culinary universe.

Popular London joint Burger & Lobster, which opened its first outlet in Jewel, has expanded its reach with a bigger branch at the hotel. Its main draw? Accessible location, a more elegant vibe fitting of the hotel’s reputation and an expanded menu comprising of exclusive dishes and signatures.

The iconic Writers Bar has now expanded into a full-fledged watering hole, offering bespoke cocktails, while the Raffles Courtyard is the best alfresco spot to park yourself if you need to while away an afternoon with potent cocktails and small bites.

Remember the beloved Ah Teng's Café? You can now find it within the Raffles Boutique—previously known as the Raffles Gift Shop—to elevate how you shop and dine.

Doesn’t the new Raffles Hotel Singapore sound more exciting now? 

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Long Bar

A visit to the Raffles Hotel Singapore won’t be complete without a drink at the revamped Long Bar—home of the classic Singapore Sling. The century-old recipe has been given an update: first with the use of Widges gin, made exclusively for the bar, with botanical notes that complement the mixture of pineapple juice, lime juice, Curaçao and Bénédictine. The pink hue comes from the cherry liqueur and grenadine—made from 100 per cent pomegranate juice.

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La Dame De Pic, Raffles Singapore

The spot formerly occupied by Raffles Grill is now home to Anne-Sophie Pic’s first restaurant in Asia. Kevin Gatin, who has been Pic’s protégé for over eight years, helms the kitchen and brings to life her signature French cuisine peppered with Asian accents.

While the menus often change according to seasons, some signatures remain, including the much raved about Berlingots. Parcels of pasta are filled with indulgent French cheese fondue and given a local touch with the use of herb of grace or chou cao.

Other must-tries on the current offerings include Brittany Lobster, delicately roasted with shellfish butter and bathed in coriander-and-barley infused broth, as well as Tajima wagyu beef, roasted to perfection and adorned with smoked beetroot and osmanthus-infused mushroom broth.

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Grand Lobby

The reopening of the Grand Dame means the return of the iconic Raffles Afternoon Tea at the restored Grand Lobby. Take in the beautiful surrounds as you feast on lavish offerings such as crumbly scones, homemade rose petal jam, assorted finger sandwiches and sumptuous desserts crafted by executive pastry chef Tai Chien Lin—served in a three-tiered silver stand. 

There’s more to savour now with the addition of the roving trolley, where you’ll find seasonal pastries including “Long Bar chocolate” peanut bar, coconut mango passionfruit verrine and French pistachio religieuse. 

Further enhancing the afternoon are drinks. You’ve got tea sommeliers who can recommend the ideal pairing, while a glass of Billecart-Salmon Champagne welcomes you upon arrival. The latter is quite special as the Raffles Hotel Singapore has collaborated with the champagne house to release 3,000 individually-numbered bottles commemorating the hotel’s reopening.

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Tiffin Room

This Indian stalwart that's been a part of the hotel’s rich and colourful history since 1892. While the interiors have been given a modern update, the concept remains the same: serve delicious North Indian cuisine made with fresh ingredients and ground spices in colourful tiffin carriers.

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兿 Yì by Jereme Leung

Singaporean Masterchef Jereme Leung’s homecoming is in the form of this beautiful Cantonese restaurant, located at the newly opened Raffles Arcade. He won’t serve fusion nor east-meets-west fare, but Cantonese classics as well as his own version of China’s ancient delicacies with fresh and seasonal ingredients, using modern culinary techniques.

Yi by Jereme Leung

City Hall/ Bras Basah
$ $ $ $
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Butcher’s Block

Signature concept Long Bar Steakhouse has been given a well-deserved update, which is now called Butcher’s Block. Rest assured, it’s still home to a plethora of premium cuts such as the bone-in sirloin club steak and the exclusive John Stone Angus grass‑fed dry-aged full loin bone-in cut, dry-aged in house. These are complemented by chef de cuisine Remy Lefebvre’s non-meat dishes; standouts include the seemingly fresh-off-the-garden baby spinach jazzed up with an umami saffron butter balanced with lemon zest, and the rich and creamy macaroni bbq enriched with comte cheese.

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Oshino

Located in a secluded part of the hotel is this famous sushi-ya, helmed by veteran chef-owner Koichiro Oshino, formerly of Shinji by Kanesaka. Here he serves an omakase menu that revolves around seasonal offerings, but you can always look forward to his Edomae or Edo-style sushi that consists of marinated fish atop special sushi rice accented with Japanese red vinegar.

Oshino

City Hall/ Bras Basah
$ $ $ $