Mothers know best—especially so when it comes to looking like your best self. We ask the owners of Drunk Elephant, Supergoop, Tatcha and Ksisters to share the best skincare tips they hope their children will pick up

What’s one essential beauty tip that your mother has taught you to never forget? It’s completely normal for people to credit their mums for showing them certain skincare or makeup tips and tricks they’ve picked up over the years. And that’s the beauty of it all—the lessons passed down from one generation to another in the interest of achieving healthy skin and, well, near-perfect makeup skills.

This Mother’s Day, we ask four beauty brand owners—from a South Korean K-beauty expert to the founders of world renowned beauty brands—to share the most important beauty tips they hope their children will learn from them and how motherhood has inspired them to strive for success.

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What is the most important skincare or beauty tip that you’d like to pass on to your children?

“If she takes away just one thing from me, I hope she remembers that what’s good for the body is good for the skin. That’s because our skin is a reflection of our mental, physical, and spiritual health. Ingredients like rice, green tea, and seaweed, which have been staples of the nutrient-rich Japanese diet for centuries, do wonders for the skin. Everything you expose yourself to, whether it's skincare you put on your face, the environment you live in, or the food that you eat, it’s all a reflection of how you honour your body. You only get one in this life—treat it well!”

—Vicky Tsai, founder, Tatcha

“Use suncream every single day with enough amount. Sun exposure is 90 per cent of your ageing cause. So before you find any good skincare product, finding the right SPF product is most important for your healthy skin! It is all about priorities.”

—Jungmin Lee, founder, Ksisters and Jung Beauty

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“You can’t have skincare without daily SPF!”

—Holly Thaggard, founder, Supergoop

“Avoid heavy foundation. I love healthy bare skin!”

—Tiffany Masterson, founder and chief creative officer, Drunk Elephant  

As a busy entrepreneur, in what ways do your children inspire you as a working mum?

“They motivate me to do what I do every single day––to create a brighter future for them by changing the way the world thinks about sunscreen (which will ultimately stop the epidemic of skin cancer). Thankfully they are already much more tuned into daily SPF than I was at their age.”

—Holly Thaggard, founder, Supergoop

“They inspire me with their world views, their tech-savvy ways, their kindness and inclusiveness, their work ethic, their independence, their style, and their opinions of my products! They also inspire me with their ideas. They're so wonderful and I'm just in love with them!”

—Tiffany Masterson, founder and chief creative officer, Drunk Elephant  

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“As a busy working mum, I don't have time to waste. I need a proven and fast solution for problems, so I and my customers can save energy and time and be present when we are with [our families]. When I curate and source brands from Korea [for my brand Ksisters], I make sure to find brands which have great consumer reviews rather than [those with big budgets for advertisements]. 

My kids inspire me in different ways too. I like to stand in their shoes and look at myself as a role model. It is not about being successful, but more about pressing on until your dreams and plans come to life. So showing them this grit mentality with my own life is very important to me because it is the most important life lesson that I want to teach my kids.”

—Jungmin Lee, founder, Ksisters and Jung Beauty

“My daughter just turned 12, and I’m finding that these early tween years are a lot about identity. It’s caused me to reflect a bit on my own constructs of identity. We spend a lot of our time labelling ourselves—business person, wife, mother, sister, Asian American—but there's a difference between labels and identity. Right now she’s evaluating who she is, what she believes, what she stands for, who her people are, and where she feels most at home in the world. As I go into this second half of my life, I'm watching how she's negotiating and finding herself and trying to be really open and thoughtful for myself, too.”

—Vicky Tsai, founder, Tatcha

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