Cover Yellow is the new Tiffany Blue: an April Fools' Day prank gone wonderfully right

On the heels of its #TiffanyYellow April Fools’ Day prank earlier this year, jeweller Tiffany & Co unveils its first Tiffany Yellow pop-up in Los Angeles

On the 1st of April this year, Tiffany & Co took its followers on Instagram by surprise when it swapped its signature robin’s egg blue for a sunny yellow. In a post that’s now accrued over 400,000 likes, the jewellery house shared an image of a yellow Tiffany & Co box, simply captioned: “Introducing our new House colour #TiffanyYellow”.  

While keen-eyed followers of the brand correctly guessed that it was the brand’s April Fools’ Day prank, many others were understandably shocked at the change from the iconic Tiffany Blue, generating a huge buzz online. So it’s no surprise that Tiffany & Co—with its more playful and irreverent tone under the new direction of luxury conglomerate LVMH—decided to go with the flow, installing a yellow-themed pop-up at its location at Rodeo Drive, Los Angeles boasting yellow furniture, food, and of course, yellow Tiffany & Co boxes and shopping bags.  

Completing the experience was an exhibition of the jewellery house’s important loose yellow diamonds, including the crown jewel: the 128.54 carat Tiffany Yellow Diamond. 

The Tiffany Yellow Diamond

Discovered in 1877 in the Kimberley mine in South Africa, the Tiffany Yellow Diamond was originally 287.42 carats in the rough. Purchased by Charles Lewis Tiffany for USD18,000, the stunning gem—one of the largest yellow diamonds ever discovered—was then cut by gemologist George Frederick Kunz into a modified cushion shape with a total of 82 facets so as to maximise its brilliance. 

To date, only four women have worn this historic piece of jewellery—the wife of diplomat Edwin Sheldon Whitehouse at the 1957 Tiffany Ball, actress Audrey Hepburn in 1961 for publicity photographs for Breakfast at Tiffany’s, singer-songwriter Lady Gaga at the 91st Academy Awards, and actress Gal Gadot in the film Death on the Nile

Related: Tiffany & Co Acquires Rare, 80-Carat Diamond to Reimagine its Historic 1939 World's Fair Necklace

The story was translated and edited by Claire Teo.