Cover Photo: Courtesy of Supriya Lele

From British-Indian darling Supriya Lele to newcomer Chet Lo, these young emerging designers dare you to show some skin next spring

If the packed schedule of this edition of London Fashion Week is anything to go by, people are raring to see and be seen again, and the outfits on offer by the young design talents are out to match the energy. Sexy, skin-tight, sheer looks abounded, as did colour-blocked pieces with strategic paneling. There has not been more skin in the game–literally.

Beyond this year’s LVMH Prize winner Nensi Dojaka for whom slinky sheer pieces are her bread-and-butter, there is also British-Indian designer Supriya Lele who added some bejewelled mermaid netting to her repertoire. Charlotte Knowles gave her collection a cowgirl spin, while Asian-American designer Chet Lo, who made his debut as part of Fashion East, evoked a surreal beach paradise with his signature prickly knitwear.

See also: London Fashion Week SS22: Punchy Florals Take Over the Runways

Supriya Lele

Charlotte Knowles

Nensi Dojaka

Newcomer Azura Lovisa, who is half Swedish, half Malaysian, created beautiful designs in raw-silk inspired by shamanism in her mother’s home country of Malaysia. “I was really fascinated by the idea of folklore, talismans and shamanism,” says Lovisa. “My mother actually has a tiny shard of crystal that was inserted under her skin in her jaw as a talisman, so when she gets X-rays done at the dentists, she has some explaining to do!”

See also: LFW Exclusive: Halpern’s Designer on His Asian Connection and Touching Ballet-Inspired Collection

Beyond the flowing shapes with chic slits and cut-outs, she also designed some jewellery with two friends in the shape of spices like cardamom, chilli and star anise that can be worn as earrings or brooches, like lucky charms.

The designer, who cut her teeth under Alexander Wang at Balenciaga, dreams of shooting her next collection in Malaysia. When asked whether the risqué pieces could be culturally sensitive in a country that follows Islamic dress codes, Lovisa says, “Actually if you layer the pieces on top of each other or over trousers or skirts, you don’t have to see the skin. That’s why I want to shoot in Malaysia to show how my clothes can transform for different audiences.”

See also: 8 Vegan and Sustainable Sneaker Brands to Have on Your Radar

Azura Lovisa